101 Band Promotion Ideas [RE-BLOG]

Band Promotion Blog

(UPDATED 12/18/10)

I stumbled upon the holy grail for those of you interested in band promotion. It really offers some great advice on how to get your band heard and appreciated by the public.

101 Band Promotion Ideas via (@BandPromotion)

Here are 3 of my favorite tips from Ian’s list that can really help a band with their online promotion:

1. Get yourself a Website.

Suite7's official band website

You can have all the free social networking accounts in the world, but none of them can take the place of having an official website to represent your music. Your official website should act like a hub for EVERYTHING about your music and your online presence. At the very least, your official website should provide clear links to all of your social networking profiles, links to download and purchase your music, and sign-up forms so fans can easily join your e-mail list. If you still aren’t convinced, here are 20 more reasons for why you need an official website.

2. Build an online community.

online community

Especially for artists just starting out, an online community may be a bit too much. Creating a blog, updating it regularly, and allowing fans to post comments is a great starting place. These can be short news updates, or long rants over something you feel passionately about. Just make sure your writing is frequent, and is relevant to your fan base. Also, e-mail is still one of the top forms of communication, so collect your fan’s e-mail addresses and send them a few monthly updates and perks via an e-mail newsletters. Unlike blogging, try to keep the frequency of e-mails fairly low (3-4 times a month), otherwise you will come off as annoying and spammy.

3. Think global, but act local first.

support local

You can reach a vast amount of people through the Internet, but spreading yourself too thin can be fatal to your music career. It is a good idea to start local, with the family and friends who already know your name and what you’re up to. Talk to them and get their friends and family into it, and build from there. Offer these local fans some great incentives to keep returning to your shows, your website, etc.

Eventually, you will develop the kind of close relationships that will keep them coming back again and again. Your friends will start to tell their friends, and the cycle will continue. Once you feel confident that you have created a tight knit community of fans in one area, start the process over and branch out to surrounding communities. This is the best way to build a base of loyal, meaningful fans.

If you focus the majority of your promotional efforts around these 3 main ideas, you’ll be off to a great start getting your name out there and your music heard…and maybe even into the “right hands” if a record deal is what you’re aiming for.

Image credits –
#1 – Click here
#2 – Click here
#3 – Click here
#4 – Click here

  • http://www.unsignedbandpromotion.com/band-promotion-blog/ Unsigned Band Promotion

    Thanks for that Chris :) But don’t concentrate on MySpace too much guys, get a website so you can earn some real money, and get some real promotion going ;)

    Keep in touch

    ian

  • http://www.unsignedbandpromotion.com/band-promotion-blog/ Unsigned Band Promotion

    Thanks for that Chris :) But don’t concentrate on MySpace too much guys, get a website so you can earn some real money, and get some real promotion going ;)

    Keep in touch

    ian

  • classicrocker415

    right, i do agree with you there…..however myspace is a great starting point for people who cannot finance & maintain a website right off the bat.

    thanks for the great article & for the comment :)

  • classicrocker415

    right, i do agree with you there…..however myspace is a great starting point for people who cannot finance & maintain a website right off the bat.

    thanks for the great article & for the comment :)

  • http://www.tightmixblog.com Chris Bracco

    Also, if you are not very tech-savvy, there are companies like BandZoogle.com that provide excellent services to make it easy to create your own official website for your music. Check them out if you get a second.

  • http://www.tightmixblog.com Chris Bracco

    Also, if you are not very tech-savvy, there are companies like BandZoogle.com that provide excellent services to make it easy to create your own official website for your music. Check them out if you get a second.

  • http://www.artworkservicesusa.com/ Artworkservices

    Great article! I agree with promoting brand locally first then globally

  • http://tightmixblog.com Chris B.

    Thanks for reading!

  • UnsignedBandPromotion

    I’m liking the updated site and the version of this blog post – nice work Chris :)

    Happy Christmas

  • http://tightmixblog.com Chris B.

    Thanks man!

  • http://www.promoteyourmusic.net Chris Rockett

    I think myspace is still good for new bands because it ranks well in google and you can set it fast.

    It’s still one of the big sites on the web by I’m going to focus on facebook in 2011 and auto post to myspace.

    Chris

  • Jeremy Gilbert

    Solid research information is available online. Using social media to
    market your music is effective if you use listening skills, establish
    trust, add value, and project authenticity. Importance is placed on
    strategies and actual tools you use to promote your music. The best
    strategies are found in social media networks.

  • Jeremy Gilbert

    Also make sure you make it easy for people to leave email addresses at
    your CD sales table. Even better, would be to get people to give you the
    email in the middle of the gig. You might make up an “Email Song” then
    have someone pass around a guest book where everyone leaves their email
    address.

  • Jeremy Gilbert

    Also make sure you make it easy for people to leave email addresses at
    your CD sales table. Even better, would be to get people to give you the
    email in the middle of the gig. You might make up an “Email Song” then
    have someone pass around a guest book where everyone leaves their email
    address.